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Call it a sign of the times: a new survey reveals that one in three Americans would consider obtaining a mortgage from Walmart and almost half would consider one from online payment provider PayPal.

Reuters reports that in a survey conducted by Charlotte, N.C.-based Carlisle & Gallagher Consulting Group, two-thirds of respondents said the high cost of getting a loan was the least pleasant part of the mortgage application process, followed by slow execution (56%) and poor communication with the lender (32%). While the survey found no evidence of consumers abandoning their relationships with banks, the willingness for going beyond the traditional banking route for a residential home loan suggests the possibility of significant changes in the future of the origination market.

"There is a real threat from new entrants," says Doug Hautop, lending practice lead at the Carlisle & Gallagher.

The survey was conducted online in September and polled 618 U.S. consumers.





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